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 Painting Inside the Front Fenders
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Vanmor
Cochise

USA
573 Posts

Posted - 28 Jan 2014 :  04:18:46 AM  Show Profile  Visit Vanmor's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Right now I'm working on my inner fenders. I treated the tire side of them with bedliner and then painted them black. The engine side will get the factory looking semi gloss black.

I was wondering what to do to the fenders them selves. They are off the car and need some cleaning up and one very small rust hole to fix. One of the fenders is a Tempest or Lemans fender with a GTO nose grafted to it. I need to drill the holes for the GTO emblem on that one.

After doing all this, what do I need to do to the fenders as far a coating them. I'm going to completely cover them in primer inside and out. I was just wondering what to paint on the inside ? More bedliner, semi gloss black paint or the same color paint as on the outside ?

"A man has got to know his limitations." Dirty Harry

Admin
Ye Olde Webmaster

844 Posts

Posted - 28 Jan 2014 :  12:44:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
First thing is to see what "color" if any, is in the inside of the fender. Some cars may have color, others a flat black or charcoal gray paint. If there's an area that is exposed to exterior paint color shoot enough of the proposed color on the sections that's visible.

Wash out the inside of the fender--fix any rusted areas--coat with a protective sealer-paint and shoot the inside as mentioned.

I am doing the same thing on my TA's fenders. The inside is a flat black, so that what it will get when all the minor body work is completed. Hope this helps.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

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Vanmor
Cochise

USA
573 Posts

Posted - 28 Jan 2014 :  10:05:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit Vanmor's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks Bill. Just an FYI.......

I really messed up with the bed liner. I thought the product was bad and I did get a refund from Rustoleum. When I applied it, it was goopy. It wasn't black either. I didn't know you had to take a mixer beater and chuck it in an electric drill to mix it. That's why I had to go back and paint it black. If it had been mixed properly, there would have been no need to paint it. As there is some black paint that mixes with the polymer coating.

I had big wads of the polymer on the inside of my inner fenders. I knew it was going to be hard to get that stuff off, so while it was still wet, I took an old brush and cut it off to make it stiffer. I then kept dabbing at the globs with the brush to move them around. It worked well enough.

I'll know how to use the bed liner next time. When all else fails, read the instructions !

I'll paint the inside of the fenders the same color as the inner fenders or fender wells.


"A man has got to know his limitations." Dirty Harry
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Admin
Ye Olde Webmaster

844 Posts

Posted - 29 Jan 2014 :  08:53:24 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Read the directions? Yeah--that will help...r-i-g-h-t. They omit to tell you that after you stir the mixture for 1 minute 36 seconds, you must stop, slowly draw the tool from the mixture, count to 3, look toward the east, lift your left leg two inches off the ground and then proceed. If you don't lift the correct leg--the stuff is goopy. If you look to the west--forget about it.

All kidding aside--the products today seem to be less forgiving then years back. The chemistry requires explicit following--assuming that's really possible.

Bill

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

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Vanmor
Cochise

USA
573 Posts

Posted - 29 Jan 2014 :  2:11:45 PM  Show Profile  Visit Vanmor's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Actually your right. They don;t really tell you much about mixing the product. There are a few videos on YouTube about it. Problem is, you have to look at all of them before you find out about the mixing procedure.

The Rustoleum bedliner is nothing but the same polymer that is used in rust encapsulators and converters. They ad some rough texture to it and black paint. The rust converter is cheaper and goes a lot further. So applying that and then giving it a coat of paint should work as well. The bedliner is a bit thicker and can be used to fill things like pin holes in your trunk floor. That will be the next thing the bedliner gets used for.

I'm starting to wonder if bedliner would be a good thing to coat the underside of the car ?

"A man has got to know his limitations." Dirty Harry

Edited by - Vanmor on 29 Jan 2014 2:16:37 PM
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