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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 02 Feb 2015 :  2:44:09 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
Update: 2 Feb 2015

This morning the cowl area was tackled with cleaning tools and alcohol. It cleaned up nicely, so the next step was to see if the original gloss paint could be enhanced with machine buffing-polish. Within 15 minutes a deep, rich glossy appearance was reflecting images. Since I now have lots of stainless steel fasteners, the 4 bolts securing the wiper arms to the body were exchanged with 4 stainless hex head bolts. Since these were machine threads, not sheet metal, each SS bolt was treated with anti-seize compound before screwing them in.

There's a lot more to do to the subframe (which is the area I dislike working on the most).

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 03 Feb 2015 :  08:52:59 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
Below is a photo of the cowl area (driver's side). This was taken following my buffing the area with a polishing machine and Mequiar's polishing compound. The original luster (sheen) reappeared and plate and rubber stopper installed.

In a previous post above, I mentioned that the black paint that covers the cowl area and firewall must have been applied after the body was painted with #29 Nocturne Blue. This photo illustrates that deduction as the black gloss fades into the body color. It is similar on the opposite side too. The fenders must have been in place when the black was shot? Really? This doesn't make a lot of sense to me, but appears to be the case. I've owned the TA since it was brand new and know this fender has never been off the car so that must have been how it was done. Bizarre.



In this close up photo the camel tan interior color used to color the dashboard is visible on the cowl. It appears to be laid on top of the body color and the cowl/firewall black was shot on top of that.



Curious about this, I looked at the driver's side fender that's sitting safely in the garage to see if there was any telltale signs of black overspray on the fender. I didn't see any but must note that the fenders were cleaned dozens of times inside the engine bay and any overspray may have been removed in those cleanings over time. I just don't know. Where's Sherlock Holmes when he's needed?

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 05 Feb 2015 :  3:02:30 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
5 Feb 2015 Update:

With all of the subframe painted on the passenger side, my goal was to install the new emissions tube (from Inline Tube) that connects the charcoal canister to the gas tank. There are two sections of steel tubing. The front section was rusted and pitted and it needed to go. It was a job getting the old one out and I figured the new one would be even trickier to install with the engine in place.

The tube came from Inline Tube in large carton, however it was flagged between two points indicating that section needed to be straightened for the installation. The tube comes pre-bent to follow the contour of the frame. With the helpful assistance of my son, Brian, we were able to get it into place without too much extra bending and fastened it into place.

Tasks on my to-do list are being checked off--that's a very good sign.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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cortcomp
Coyote

USA
5335 Posts

Posted - 05 Feb 2015 :  6:06:51 PM  Show Profile  Visit cortcomp's Homepage
Glad to hear it went in smooth! I order lots of that kind of stuff from them, and am always pleased with the fit.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 09 Feb 2015 :  11:50:27 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
A few days have passed. A couple of things to mention.

The Totally Stainless kit isn't working out for me. There are no "tapping screws" in it. Tapping screws are used without nuts. They make their own threads into the base metal. There are many of these screws securing various lines to the body or subframe. What was provided was machine bolts--5/16" SAE. None of these work although designated to secure these lines. Also, the tapping screws are metric on my TA. It's a bit deceiving because a 1/2" socket or wrench will work on removing or installing these tapping screws, however, a 13mm socket or wrench is what it really takes. My TA is interspersed with bolts and screws, metric and SAE. Your Firebird may be quite different. My car was built in CA.

It appears at this moment, that a substantial number of fasteners in the kit will not work on my car. This is disappointing.

This morning I had a "clean-up on aisle 2," so to speak--power steering fluid. The 3/8" ID non-high pressure hose split and leaked oil onto the garage floor. So, this needs to be fixed. It's been in place since my rebuild in '96. Better that it "let go" today than while using the car.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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cortcomp
Coyote

USA
5335 Posts

Posted - 09 Feb 2015 :  1:40:50 PM  Show Profile  Visit cortcomp's Homepage
Sorry to hear that the kit is lacking. When i need stainless that isn't included in something, i try to get it at lowes who has an OK but overpriced selection. I hear Menards has great stainless prices but ours is just built and not open yet. Maybe there's a vendor local you can get a box of the self tapping screws in stainless for not too much to handle all the line screws you need?
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 09 Feb 2015 :  4:03:34 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
Mike--the hunt continues. What I will do is install the existing fasteners and when I come across the right SS I'll swap them out. Lot's more work, but worth it. I'm hoping it's not the Holy Grail.

Re-assembled all of my accessory brackets so the alternator and PS pump could be installed. Final adjustments pending new belts.

Funny, when the belts were removed I didn't carefully examine them. Since there was maybe 5,000-6000 miles on them I incorrectly assumed they would be fine, not so. These 14-year old alternator and PS belts are cracking and must be replaced.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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cortcomp
Coyote

USA
5335 Posts

Posted - 09 Feb 2015 :  4:40:45 PM  Show Profile  Visit cortcomp's Homepage
Modern belts seem kind of blah, i've had some not make it 2 years before showing wear. The name brands (goodyear etc) still seem to hold up well.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 10 Feb 2015 :  12:03:34 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
Still checking "to do" things off my list. Debated whether to replace the black convoluted poly wire looms that "manage" all the wires routing here and there from the firewall. Located a couple of places were the looms were inexpensive per foot. Then, as an alternative, decided to see if these looms could be cleaned up so new looms were not necessary. They can. Here's how I did it.

Using a bristle brush to loosen the dust from the groves, acetone was then used to wipe them clean. That was followed with a detailing spray that brought out the black and added a nice shine to them. A person would not be convinced that they weren't brand new. The product applied is called Instant Shine (SW-936) from Sprayway. It is used for rubber, body moldings and engine compartments. Good stuff.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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cortcomp
Coyote

USA
5335 Posts

Posted - 10 Feb 2015 :  2:30:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit cortcomp's Homepage
I have been looking for just such a detailer for hoses, etc. Thanks for the tip!
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Phil
The Great White Buffalo

USA
7215 Posts

Posted - 10 Feb 2015 :  2:40:01 PM  Show Profile
Good move, the new stuff may look like a direct replacement but it's more along the lines of dollar store grade.

Bowties are for Pee-wee Herman. "Chevy": even the name sounds cheap, but not as cheap as your Pontiac will be with an LS transplant.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 10 Feb 2015 :  3:06:39 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
Also available, and used on our engines is a higher temp convoluted loom made of nylon. These are marked with a faint gray line on one side. Several of my 3/4" lines (OEM) have this marking on them. The poly is good up to 200 degree F. The nylon hi temp is more expensive per foot but less likely to melt.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.

Edited by - Bill Boyle on 10 Feb 2015 3:07:11 PM
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 10 Feb 2015 :  7:38:04 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
Topic: Electrical connectors

There are several OEM connectors that have become brittle with age. I'm hesitant in disconnecting most of them fearing that they will break. I'm looking for a source to buy and replace them. Any suggestions? Here's one of them:




"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 11 Feb 2015 :  08:56:32 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
The off-white connector shown above has always resided where you see it. It connects red wires to the alternator and the high blower relay (see photos below). The plastic connector has two parts, female and male. Each plastic connector houses a brass terminal, also female and male. This style of connector has 1 cavity. Some have 2, 3 or 4.

By looking at the close-up photo, the red wires are two different gauges. The wire to the left which attaches to the alternator terminal is a smaller gauge than the wire on the right. Consequently, to duplicate this connection, the brass terminal must be different in order to accept the correct gauge wire.

What I've learned is this style connector is a Packard 56 series and parts still exist to duplicate this connection.

What I do wonder about is why this wire, that runs from the alternator terminal to the high blower relay, runs unprotected (no poly convoluted loom) down the top of the engine alongside the driver's side valve cover and then across the back of the engine to the high blower relay. This routing has puzzled me for years. Could this not have been routed differently, better, not exposing it to the heat of the engine?





For the time being, the routing will remain the same. More on this to follow.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 12 Feb 2015 :  1:00:32 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
It's Lincoln's BD anniversary. Feb 12th. Where's the cake?
++++++

When my headers were removed many months ago, several other parts were removed. (Starter, oil pump with housing and braided lines to remote filter set up). I've considered whether to simply return to using the screw in PF24 oil filter or reinstall the remote oil system. Some have remarked that a remote oil system may cause a drop in oil pressure. This is possible but is not something I've experienced with my remote set up.

The reason for the remote, in the first place, was due to the Super Comp Hooker #4109 headers that didn't give me adequate room to remove the PF24 filter. When it came time to change oil and filter after the header installation, I couldn't remove the filter whole, and wound up crushing it to get it out. What a mess that was. I despise oil residue burning off exhaust pipes.

The remote came with hydraulic hose and brass fittings that were later upgraded with braided lines and Aeroquip aluminum fittings. The location of this set up was a question--where to put it? Thinking it out, I placed it on the firewall tucked behind the base air cleaner. The braided lines ran up and back from the housing on the passenger side up to the filter. The filter was larger than the PF24 holding twice as much filtered oil. I've used AC's PF2, Purolator's L30001, Wix's 51515 and NAPA's version of the Wix.

One of the advantages, at least for me, was cleanliness. While it was still necessary to jack up the car, put it on stands to drop the used oil and collect it, the filter change was made standing up on the driver's side of the car. There was little, if any, leakage of used oil. Spinning a new filter on was quick and easy.

The real disadvantage is the time it takes to install the oil housing, adjust the swivel Aeroquip fittings and tightening everything up. It's not easy working around the headers. This time I have to be even more careful--new header coating needs to stay unmarred.

So, with the system off the car (again) it's being cleaned up for reinstallation. The Hedman headers will go in first followed by the remote filter system and starter.

Maybe next week....

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Phil
The Great White Buffalo

USA
7215 Posts

Posted - 12 Feb 2015 :  2:27:08 PM  Show Profile
I have to think that heat plays a big role in oil temp when the filter is surrounded by red hot header tubes. I like the remote filter idea and if I can find a suitable/reliable kit for a Pontiac I'd consider it for the Formula. Unlike your need for AC (since you live in an oven), I don't have all of that clutter anymore so it would probably look nice mounted in that area of the firewall.

Footnote: Regarding oil filters, I always laugh when I see a high dollar classic Ferrari on various TV "car shows" sporting Fram oil filters atop the engine. Apparently money and brains are mutually exclusive.

Bowties are for Pee-wee Herman. "Chevy": even the name sounds cheap, but not as cheap as your Pontiac will be with an LS transplant.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 12 Feb 2015 :  5:29:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
"Apparently money and brains are mutually exclusive."

Oh yeah!

Remember the old, "pay me now or pay me later" advertisement from Fram? Words have a funny way of backfiring.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 15 Feb 2015 :  3:00:30 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
My parts list continues to grow. Yesterday, while detailing the upper heater hose, I spotted a wear area on the underside that went to the cord. . The longer of the two heater hoses, this one sits low and made contact with the upper control arm...enough contact over time to wear through the rubber to the cord. Again, this is a situation where from all appearances the hose looked good. When one doesn't drive a car much, it's easy in my opinion to lose track of time and how long something is supposed to last. No telling how long this hose has been in place. I'm replacing it with a similar ribbed 3/4" x 36" hose. As for clamps: while the tower style clamps came with the car, these were replaced long ago with SS worm gear clamps. Tower clamps are still available to duplicate the original look. I prefer the SS worm gear.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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cortcomp
Coyote

USA
5335 Posts

Posted - 15 Feb 2015 :  3:03:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit cortcomp's Homepage
I've used the tower type clamps. only about half of them sealed, had to replace with worm gear clamps.
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Phil
The Great White Buffalo

USA
7215 Posts

Posted - 15 Feb 2015 :  10:40:09 PM  Show Profile
I agree. There seems to be a resurgence lately in encouraging people to go back to the tower clamps but I didn't have a good impression of them back when they were factory installed. After I switched to the worm style I had no more leaks. But these "TV car magazines" have been dogging worm clamps lately. Maybe they're lasting too long and the clamp manufacturers need to sell us the old junk again. Maybe they should change the name to XE tower clamps.

Bowties are for Pee-wee Herman. "Chevy": even the name sounds cheap, but not as cheap as your Pontiac will be with an LS transplant.
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cortcomp
Coyote

USA
5335 Posts

Posted - 16 Feb 2015 :  09:56:01 AM  Show Profile  Visit cortcomp's Homepage
LOL! Xe tower clamps!

I wasn't really around cars when they were factory, but the repops are junk, twist and don't seal properly most of the time. I pay attention to detail and used the correct sizes for the hose and outlets and everything. I just figured maybe the repops weren't living up to factory standards.
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Phil
The Great White Buffalo

USA
7215 Posts

Posted - 16 Feb 2015 :  11:01:18 AM  Show Profile
There's a common misconception in this hobby that if the factory did it, it's better. It's of course not always true. Many times things are done by OEM's simply because its cheaper and/or faster on the assembly line.

Bowties are for Pee-wee Herman. "Chevy": even the name sounds cheap, but not as cheap as your Pontiac will be with an LS transplant.
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Sparafucile
Sitting Bull

158 Posts

Posted - 17 Feb 2015 :  12:13:24 AM  Show Profile
After a screwed up $600 repair, I did some clamp research.

I came away with the impression that the worm gear clamp puts stress on the metal tubing and leads to failure. I would imaging in a collector one will still own the car when it fails. Seems like finding the best clamp would be better than repairing the radiator.

That reminds me; when they "fixed" their mistake, they left me with a worm gear clamp that I need to replace.

Spara
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 17 Feb 2015 :  06:54:58 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
From my experience with tower type clamps, they are not inclined to be over tightened. They are however, susceptible to leaking. The SS worm gear clamps can be overtightened and on the heater core where the metal is copper tubing, over tightening can deform the tubings shape which may cause a leak. Damage to the inlet tubing is less likely on the larger upper and lower radiator inlets. Preventing leaks is #1 for me so the SS clamps are my preferred choice to do that with the caveat not to over tighten them.

On the lower water pump outlet double SS worm gear clamps provide a sturdy leak-free connection for the lower radiator hose.


"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.

Edited by - Bill Boyle on 17 Feb 2015 07:45:00 AM
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 17 Feb 2015 :  08:03:49 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
Update: 17 Feb 2015

I've contacted a local powder coating business and requested a quote to powder coat the stock 1.25" diameter front sway bar. The sway bar has been off the car several times over the years for painting and or installing new hardware for it. A durable powder coating might last for many years and be much easier to keep clean and rust-free.. There are 2 other parts I'm also considering--both fender to radiator support braces.

+++++++

I'm hoping a few key parts that I've ordered last week show up this week so more can be done. The oil housing gasket you would think would be easy to find locally. No. I wound up ordering two, one to use and one to have on hand. The ribbed 3/4" heater hose that I mentioned in an earlier post is also on a truck somewhere heading south. With cold, snowy wintery weather in the NE, delivery may be off a day or two--not too bad considering weather conditions.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 18 Feb 2015 :  09:55:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
Here's some information about how my header reducers were treated.

The header reducers were removed because they were showing rust. Each was marked with the exhaust pipe it fit to and hit with a punch to mark it's return location to match with the header collector.

Each was treated to wire brushing to remove previous coating and to knock off surface rust.

This was followed by a wipe with acetone, and then treated with POR-15's Prep and Ready. This product dissolves rust and coats the steel with zinc phosphate to help protect it from rusting.

The Prep and Ready remained wet and allowed to dry--about 25 minutes. Then the reducers were rinsed with tap water and dried so they could be coated.

Following this, I broke out the small can of Eastwood's Factory Grey High Temp Coating. This is the same coating previously applied to the 62 heads, right above the exhaust ports (you know where the paint burns off). This product purports to protect up to 1400 degrees F; time will tell.

The High Temp Coating was applied with a throw-away brush which was cleaned up with mineral spirits.

The product is toxic smelling and I wore a 3M respirator for safety. I also had the garage door open for fresh air. The coating may be recoated in 24 hours.

Here are 3 photos to check out.






"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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cortcomp
Coyote

USA
5335 Posts

Posted - 18 Feb 2015 :  10:43:47 AM  Show Profile  Visit cortcomp's Homepage
I don't, i don't understand. There's no snow in the last picture and there's green stuff around?!
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bnorris_74
Crazy Horse

USA
1442 Posts

Posted - 18 Feb 2015 :  11:45:42 AM  Show Profile
I really like the finish/color of that product. Looks nice.

Did you paint the inside too?

Edited by - bnorris_74 on 18 Feb 2015 11:46:59 AM
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cortcomp
Coyote

USA
5335 Posts

Posted - 18 Feb 2015 :  12:24:06 PM  Show Profile  Visit cortcomp's Homepage
It does still retain that "fresh exhaust" look instead of a flat cast iron look, i like it.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 19 Feb 2015 :  12:31:50 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
Well, I got my powder coating quote back. It seems they have a minimum powder coating start position and that's $100. So, that's the quote they gave me to powder coat my sway bar. The minimum sure seems high to me.

++++++++
Just want to add that following my post I contacted the company and asked what it would be if I included the two fender support braces. They responded with $15-20 a piece. So, for the sway bar and two braces $140. I'm weighing the cost and advantages of powder coating over $4.00 in rattle can paint. I'm not sure there's a $136 advantage.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.

Edited by - Bill Boyle on 20 Feb 2015 09:33:51 AM
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cortcomp
Coyote

USA
5335 Posts

Posted - 20 Feb 2015 :  10:01:45 AM  Show Profile  Visit cortcomp's Homepage
Have you considered the do it yourself powder coating kits from like summit, etc? Cheap enough, can do more parts whenever you want. You can probably score a cheap oven on craigslist to do the baking to 400 degrees part.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 20 Feb 2015 :  3:35:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
Yes, I've looked at the DIY powder coating. Going that route would entail getting the components plus using an oven to finalize the process. Using our kitchen oven won't work and getting a used baking oven would take up space I don't have.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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bnorris_74
Crazy Horse

USA
1442 Posts

Posted - 20 Feb 2015 :  4:13:46 PM  Show Profile
What size oven would someone need to do a stabilizer bar? Pretty big.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 23 Feb 2015 :  10:40:52 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
Honestly, I think powder coating the few parts I was thinking about is "too rich for my blood." I'm thinking about shooting them with Awlgrip marine paint. That stuff is very durable.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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cortcomp
Coyote

USA
5335 Posts

Posted - 23 Feb 2015 :  12:01:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit cortcomp's Homepage
http://mro.kimballmidwest.com/search?p=Q&lbc=kimballmidwest&uid=107938883&ts=custom&w=ultra%20pro-max&isort=score&method=and&view=list&af=brand:ultrapromax%20cat1:spraypaints

This has been great stuff. It's semi gloss holds a shine for quite a long time, even after the car has sat for years, or been worked on and had fluids, etc on. Doesn't dull from cleaning, etc. I used it on a mercruiser boat outdrive and 4 years later sold the boat (heavy use in summer and stored outside in winter.) Well worth it. I always have a can of gloss, semigloss, and flat black on hand. It's very stick and coats VERY quickly, not a lot of coats needed. Downside is it's not super cheap, but i think it works well.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 23 Feb 2015 :  7:36:09 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
Update: 23 Feb 2015

Here's some photos of what was done to the master cylinder. The original was replaced with a remanufactured unit some years ago. It was painted with Krylon Acrylic Lacquer in a semi-gloss black to match the original color. The problem is that brake fluid disrupts lacquer paint so I opted to apply Eastwood's Brake Gray paint which resists the damaging chemicals found in brake fluid. The color isn't gray but silver and the product would better described as Brake Silver.


The old lacquer was cleaned off with acetone and masked for paint.


Here's the paint used.


Finished product. It's ready for the brake booster and new cap.

Tomorrow--24 Feb, the driver's side header will be installed.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.

Edited by - Bill Boyle on 23 Feb 2015 7:37:09 PM
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Phil
The Great White Buffalo

USA
7215 Posts

Posted - 23 Feb 2015 :  11:29:26 PM  Show Profile
Steady progress, nice work Bill!

Bowties are for Pee-wee Herman. "Chevy": even the name sounds cheap, but not as cheap as your Pontiac will be with an LS transplant.
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cortcomp
Coyote

USA
5335 Posts

Posted - 23 Feb 2015 :  11:42:37 PM  Show Profile  Visit cortcomp's Homepage
Looking great! I have a feeling the fever is setting in and you'll be working more and more and we'll end up seeing this whole project wrapped up way sooner than later.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 24 Feb 2015 :  1:52:36 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
Update: 24 Feb 2015

The driver's header is in!

I took lots of photos of this procedure to help others see what was done. I took extra steps to protect the headers as you will see. It's more time consuming doing it this way.

The first photo is the header with protective bubble wrap on it. Paper was added to the #1 and #7 tubes.



I'm very happy with this ceramic coating which gives these Hedman headers a lot of pizazz!





Below is a shot taken under the car looking up at the head. The Z-bar lever for the clutch is out as well as the starter. This gave me added room for my big mitts.



Installing headers aren't easy on a Pontiac, so one of the things learned via trial and error is to tack up the gasket to the head with some form of sticky gasket maker. That's what you see here.









With enough room under the car, and plenty of protection in place, the header was first lifted into place to go through the Key-hole. Then it was slid forward. The last bolt for #7 was threaded by hand, followed by the foremost front bolt on #1. The #1 was a bit of reach laying under the car. Once started, a 3/8" socket atop a swivel and long extension was used to tighten it up. Same was done with #7. However, I'm ahead of myself. Before any bolts are tightened, all should be started. Most importantly, SS needs anti-seize on them.



To do this job a 3/8" socket, swivel, long extension, ratchet and 3/8" open end wrench are used. Blue nitrile gloves were used to keep fingerprints off the header tubes and flange. Other: floor jack, jack stands (6 in use), sockets to remove large engine mount bolts. Assorted pieces of wood. Radio with '60s tunes playing. One male Collie sleeping snoring....

Below it's all done. It took longer to wrap and protect than it did to bolt it in place. With fenders off the job wasn't too bad.



The bubble wrap etc...will be kept on for awhile because the starter and Z-bar and related parts have to be installed.

Bill

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 26 Feb 2015 :  12:28:48 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
Update: 26 Feb 2015

This thread is getting very long, so I'll back up and rehash a few things.

My master cylinder went south in 2002, as I recall, and purchased a remanufactured unit. I kept the original hoping to one day have it rebuilt. At the time the master cylinder was removed, the brake booster was also removed and sent to Steve Gregori for re-plating. When it was returned it looked new and re-installed.

Jump ahead a decade. The cad plating was breaking down from high humidity and high level of salt in the air (South Florida). It was unsightly given my intention of getting the TA into show car condition again. Many cars from the 60s and 70s are exhibited and those owners displaying those cars have typically painted them gold, silver or black. The best displays, however, were those with original type cad plating. So, I contacted Steve Gregori again and had him re-plate it for a second time. It was 11 months ago that the brake booster was removed from the car. It has been sitting in the shipping box since April 2014 waiting for re-installation. Today was the day.

What was done--

Before getting started, all the photos taken in March 2014 were reviewed. Next, all parts, previously bagged and tagged were relocated and set aside. Then all the locking nuts were examined and coated with silver enamel and allowed to dry. For the second time, the threads on the firewall studs were cleaned with a brass wire brush and then lubed with anti-seize. A 15 mm open-end wrench would be used to tighten the 4 bolts to the studs securing the booster. Then, a small piece of masking tape was stuck to the jaws of the wrench. This in theory, would help prevent busting the corners on the hex nuts while being threaded and tightened.

Again, to keep fingerprints to a minimum, nitrile gloves were worn.

For months, the master cylinder was tied to a piece of wood that was clamped to the firewall. It was also braced from below when the master cylinder was repainted. All bracing came off so the brake booster could be brought in from the top with the rod going through the large hole in the firewall to the brake pedal. Most importantly, the rod must not be bent left or right, so inserting it so it would fasten to the brake pedal was of utmost concern. Before starting any nuts on the studs, check the alignment with the brake pedal--make sure the rod and brake pedal go together correctly.

With the rod in the right position, threading the lock nuts onto the studs began. This is a slow, tedious process. Access to the nuts is tight and the turns are short requiring care and patience. A drop-light and a LED head lamp were used to see work being done.

Once the 4 locking nuts were tightened, the master cylinder was gently moved into position inserting the brake booster's studs through the holes on each side. The disc brake combination valve bracket went on next and draws the brake pipes into place and secures the location of them under the master cylinder. Two locking nuts fasten the master cylinder to the studs (again 15 mm wrench).

The final steps included connecting the vacuum line to the unit, double checking all the fasteners, and most importantly inserting the clip to the rod and brake pedal.

Note: There are torque specs for the nuts to studs. However, those studs behind the brake booster are not accessible with a torque wrench. The only nuts that are accessible are the two studs that mount the master cylinder to the brake booster (24 lbs foot).

All done...here it is.


"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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cortcomp
Coyote

USA
5335 Posts

Posted - 26 Feb 2015 :  12:38:19 PM  Show Profile  Visit cortcomp's Homepage
Looking sharp! I agree, that cad plating is better looking than chrome/painted gold/black. That's going the easy route, doing ti right always takes a little more effort!
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Phil
The Great White Buffalo

USA
7215 Posts

Posted - 26 Feb 2015 :  2:06:04 PM  Show Profile
Eye candy which is just what we need right now in this frozen Siberia we call the Northeast. Or maybe its called the Armpit of the Country.

Bowties are for Pee-wee Herman. "Chevy": even the name sounds cheap, but not as cheap as your Pontiac will be with an LS transplant.
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rkellerjr
Many Feathers

USA
1260 Posts

Posted - 26 Feb 2015 :  2:09:29 PM  Show Profile
So, after I get mine back together I'll be bringing it down for a "clean up" restoration, you do great work Bill, very nice.

Rich
1975 TA - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aR86YT69yeY
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 26 Feb 2015 :  7:53:40 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
After installing the brake booster and taking some photos, I thought "am I close to seeing the light at the end of the tunnel?" For a moment my thought was "yes." In reality, the answer is "no." The engine bay is almost done...leaving body, interior, new windshield paint and leaf springs. Ugh! The tunnel is still very long and dark.

Tomorrow, I'll tackle the passenger side header.

Funny, this is like the question, "How do you eat and elephant." Answer: one bite at a time. Got to keep plugging away at this.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 02 Mar 2015 :  3:47:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
Update: Monday 2 March 2015:

Both headers are now back on the engine and the remote oil filter system that's been associated with my engine for the past 30 years is also in place. There are just a few things left to do under the car before the radiator support is positioned and bolted to the subframe.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.

Edited by - Bill Boyle on 02 Mar 2015 3:52:08 PM
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Brian R
Crazy Horse

USA
1672 Posts

Posted - 03 Mar 2015 :  08:49:30 AM  Show Profile
Awesome work Bill! Keep plugging away at it - it will suddenly be done and you will enjoy every second behind the wheel that much more!
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 03 Mar 2015 :  1:37:53 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
Update: 3 March 2015

Well, I made a mistake. Despite all the before and after photos, I forgot something that made me do something twice. Man-O-Man, you think you remember important steps. I forgot one--

When the driver's side header was installed I forgot about the room necessary to get the starter up and into position and should have left the header bolts a turn or two from being tight. Leaving it loose allows enough play in the header lift up the starter and slip it past the tubes. There's not enough clearance otherwise.

So, this morning, I realized my mistake, loosened all the driver's side header bolts and installed the starter.

The starter could have been installed before the header.

[By the way, the starter was pretty devoid of black paint and surface rust was taking over. All of that was cleaned up and repainted weeks earlier, so it was a clean unit going back in place. The electrical was connected before it was bolted in place. That part I remembered.]

Now I can remove the bubble wrap!

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.

Edited by - Bill Boyle on 03 Mar 2015 1:38:33 PM
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Brian R
Crazy Horse

USA
1672 Posts

Posted - 03 Mar 2015 :  1:46:07 PM  Show Profile
Don't forget the shims (if necessary)
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4794 Posts

Posted - 04 Mar 2015 :  07:48:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage
Earlier in this thread there was some discussion about the remote oil filter. Below is a photo of the filter and filter housing. It is mounted to the firewall between the air conditioning box and the HEI distributor. It doesn't touch the distributor or the wires nor does it contact the big shaker air cleaner.

Initial the housing was mounted directly to the firewall. The old holes are still visible. However, that position didn't work as well as it should have even with the swivel fittings, so a bracket was fashioned that extends the housing out from the firewall and provides a more direct routing of the lines. The braided lines run down between the firewall and the engine avoiding contact with the headers. Swivel fittings receive the braided lines that enter the oil housing to the engine.

As mentioned, this system has been used for 30 years. The braided lines and fittings a few less. It has been leak free. Oil pressure was no different than when using the PF-24.

What I find interesting, is that I've been to at least 50 car shows plus cruise-ins since returning to South Florida in 2003. I have not seen one hot rod, not one muscle car, with a remote oil system. With this in mind, and with the parts in hand, I stopped momentarily and thought, should this go back on? The answer was yes, it works for me.


"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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rkellerjr
Many Feathers

USA
1260 Posts

Posted - 04 Mar 2015 :  08:23:43 AM  Show Profile
Seems to me that would be messy chaing the filter with it dripping down the back of the engine and onto the transmission.

Rich
1975 TA - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aR86YT69yeY
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