Pontiac Street Performance
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password

 All Forums
 Pontiac Performance
 Firebirds / Formulas/ TAs
 Bill Boyle's 79 TA Restoration Project--Part 4
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Author  Topic Next Topic  

Admin
Ye Olde Webmaster

861 Posts

Posted - 29 Jun 2019 :  4:29:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is the continuation thread to Parts 1, 2 and 3 of the TA project. The journey continues with Interior assembly and wrapping up dozens of loose ends and detailing to follow.


"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 29 Jun 2019 :  6:14:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: Saturday, 29 June 2019

Today was laying out the heat shield and pre-fitting the many pre-cut pieces to the contour of the back seat cabin partition, and the flooring underneath the back seat. The pre-cut pieces are generally close but trimming was performed on most pieces to get a tighter fit.

BTW, trimming was tried with a sharp utility knife, using a piece of wood to bear down on. The jute backing is tough to cut that way so I gave up on that method. I then tried scissors and the first pair was too dull, a second pair cut just fine.

Enough is enough for today; I'll get back on it again tomorrow.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 30 Jun 2019 :  1:01:14 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Below are 3 photos taken last night.







More fitting will take place this afternoon. One key thing is to locate all the bolt holes for the bucket seats and seat belts and mark and trim the insulation now. The new carpeting sits atop the insulation and bolts for the seats and seat belts need to be fed through the carpeting and the insulation into their respective threaded hole in the floor pan without complication.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page

Lee
Sitting Bull

191 Posts

Posted - 01 Jul 2019 :  05:42:55 AM  Show Profile  Visit Lee's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Great to see your steady progress, Bill! Keep up the great work!

CURRENT: '73 T/A clone, starting to get less boring!...
67 Firebird (sold) 11.27 @ 119.6 Feb. '05 issue HPP
69 Falcon wagon, 10.51 @ 130mph Feb. '10 issue PHR (sold)
72 Cutlass Convertible, first car, owned since '82, now with a 6.0 LS, mild, putting just under 400 hp/tq to the wheels.
www.LNLPD.com
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 01 Jul 2019 :  11:08:50 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks Lee.

How are you coming along with the '73 FB?

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page

Lee
Sitting Bull

191 Posts

Posted - 01 Jul 2019 :  1:18:32 PM  Show Profile  Visit Lee's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Up and down, on the '73. I don't remember if I discussed my accident last year, I came really close to losing use of my right hand. I've come a long way though, and have built a motor and done a bunch of other work for a friends 67 LeMans - so I'm doing better :-)

I was going to yank my 455 to do some upgrades, but I had a chance to do some test fitting for a new gauge package from New Vintage USA. I just finished up on that project last week, and they are sending me the first set as a thank you, it is supposed to ship this week. Once the new gauges are installed and working properly, then I'll be yanking the engine. Dave Bisschop is working on some heads for me, so that should be happening later this year :-)


CURRENT: '73 T/A clone, starting to get less boring!...
67 Firebird (sold) 11.27 @ 119.6 Feb. '05 issue HPP
69 Falcon wagon, 10.51 @ 130mph Feb. '10 issue PHR (sold)
72 Cutlass Convertible, first car, owned since '82, now with a 6.0 LS, mild, putting just under 400 hp/tq to the wheels.
www.LNLPD.com
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 02 Jul 2019 :  5:18:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Lee, don't think I was aware of the injury and how frightening that must have been for you. Sure glad you're on the road to recovery with your right hand.

Update: 2 July 2019--

Boy is it hot out. 88 degrees in my garage this morning at 9 am. Keeping the door shut and the portable AC unit running does little but feed Florida Power and Light. The unit isn't capable of cooling that much air when it reaches that temperature. All and all, I'll tough it out. Spraying 3M adhesive requires good ventilation so fans are running blowing lots of hot air around.

Making good progress on fitting the insulation although the job is taking far longer than expected. Fitting the insulation when it is dry (not ready to be glued down) and trimming it when it is dry eventually requires more trimming when the insulation is stuck in place with the spray adhesive. The padding sticks tight and fast to the metal and trimming is needed on the ends to get it just right. Jumping-jehoshaphat, that's what's taking so long.

The back seat area and the driver's side to the firewall is done. Currently working on the tunnel, trimming as I go. Overall it looks good and I do believe the cabin will be much quieter than it ever has been. The exhaust note will still be audible but quiet enough to listen to music and make out my wife telling me to lay of the fast starts. More photos to come....

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.

Edited by - Bill Boyle on 02 Jul 2019 5:19:38 PM
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 04 Jul 2019 :  4:56:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: 4 July 2019--Happy Independence Day

The interior of the car, that is, the roof, floor pan, back and package shelf are all padded with insulation. It took a while...but it's done.

I have heat insulation padding for the trunk as well but will not install it now (or possibly ever). The TA never came with a super nice carpet, just a felt type black carpet with some jute pieces attached to it. The carpet in the car was discolored and pretty ratty so it was trashed a while back. Unless there is better carpet that fits the contours, I'll just seek a replacement felt carpet and I would get the replacement to see how it covers before any effort is made to insulate the trunk.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 05 Jul 2019 :  3:24:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: 5 July 2019

As mentioned in my previous post, the interior is completely insulated. However, that isn't exactly accurate. The doors will not get any Dynamat on the backside of the door skin. The doors are heavy enough with out adding more weight to them, besides, the full kit that was purchased doesn't come with anything to do with the backside of the door skins. So, the heck with it.

Thinking about the time it took to install the heat insulation padding (HIP) I soon realized there is a learning curve involved. As I got further along, how things were done changed. In other words, I got smarter and more efficient as more time and experience were gained.

Several things I want to point out. This info could help some one in the future and save them some time and frustration. First off, while the HIP is pre-cut. Trimming to make the HIP fit correctly in your car is necessary. Just because it is pre-cut doesn't mean it is a simple peel and stick--it isn't--far from it. Another thing is that just because the pieces come in large sizes, cut from a machine, that doesn't preclude you from cutting the big pieces into 3 or 4 pieces so its easier to handle. In fact, I recommend doing it. Full coverage is what you want, and being able to fit the smaller pieces together isn't difficult as the seams are tied together with the foil tape that is provided in the package. Overall, the HIP looks slick when finished.

Another worthwhile tip is this: Applying the 3M spray adhesive doesn't require multiple coats. One light coat for the floor pan pieces is okay. Two coats is good for the roof pieces, but no more. The ultimate trick is allowing the adhesive to dry on the pad and the metal. Not tacky to the touch but dry. When tacky the HIPs are difficult to align and a misstep causes immediate dislocation of the HIP and more trimming is likely for other pieces to fit. The key is to allow the adhesive to dry. Aligning the pieces is easy as there is less bite when the two adhesive parts contact one another. If wrong, it can be removed and repositioned. I learned this by trial and error. I'm passing what I learned on to others.

One of the hardest things I found in laying down the HIP and getting it adhered to the floor was locating all the pieces and trying to figure out where they go. The labeling diagram from the company is not clear and because of it, quite time consuming. This is a short fall with their product. The pieces diagram could be much better.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.

Edited by - Bill Boyle on 06 Jul 2019 07:45:50 AM
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 06 Jul 2019 :  10:45:31 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Below is video footage taken yesterday of the Heat Insulation Padding (HIP). The camel carpet should contour nicely to it.

http://www.pontiacstreetperformance.com/graphix/IMG_5174.MOV

The wheel well pads L and R (black in color) were left intact as they were tight to the wheel well. All other OEM padding was removed to insure the floor pan was solid (it was). The floor pan was cleaned and dried before the Dynamat strips were installed and re-cleaned and dried before the HIP was glued down.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.

Edited by - Bill Boyle on 06 Jul 2019 10:51:15 AM
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 08 Jul 2019 :  1:44:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: Monday, 8 July 2019--Prepping the headliner for installation

My TA has no T-tops, it's a full roof car. The new headliner vinyl (in Camel Tan) is mounted on ABS plastic. In contrast, the OEM mounting board for the TA was a thick, highly compressed cardboard. The OEM vinyl headliner foam backing broke down and was replaced by me in 1993. I bought heavy vinyl material in dark tan at a fabric shop and glued it on to the OEM mounting board. This fix worked just fine--maybe 20 years--then the cardboard broke down and the mounting board began to sag. The vinyl was still in great condition.

The new headliner is a perforated vinyl covering like the OEM and has a foam backing that is glued to the ABS plastic mounting board. There is plenty of excess vinyl material which needs to be trimmed off, wrapped around the edges of the mounting board and glued to the back.

Prepping the new headliner involved doing just that. Trimming, mitering the corners and gluing it down to the backside of the board took about an hour. X cuts were made initially where the visors mount as well as the dome light. These locations are cut outs into the ABS plastic mounting board so trimming was relatively simple. Material was also removed on each side of the board where the seat belt mechanism is located. Both areas were trimmed and glued.

Next up--installation.













"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 08 Jul 2019 :  7:05:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: late afternoon on Monday, 8 July 2019

Reinstalling the old OEM cardboard mounting board in '93 was a breeze. This time my encounter was different for one reason--the heat insulation padding (HIP) installed on the ceiling of the roof didn't allow the new ABS mounting board to get close enough to the ceiling--in other words, the bow wasn't as great, hence the mounting board wound up being 1/4" too long and the board interfered with the 6 rear Phillips head screws that fasten the rear molding to the roof which holds up the rear of the mounting board.

To remedy the problem, I located the 6 screw holes in the molding and located those areas on the mounting board. Thereafter, a 1/4" x 1/2" long notch was cut out of the rear section of the ABS mounting board at the screw locations. With the assistance of my wife (she's terrific) we installed the front of the headliner first locating the visor holes with the roof, bent the mounting board and slipped it into the rear trim molding. 4 of 6 rear trim screws were tightened to keep the headliner secure. A temporary stanchion was also put in place to provide upward pressure on the middle of the headliner so it won't sag. Visors and dome light will be tackled next.

Making great progress--but my back is sore. I'll be glad when the headliner installation is done.


"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 13 Jul 2019 :  5:08:33 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: 13 July 2019

Today, my son helped me complete the headliner installation. It should have been easy but wasn't. The aftermarket ABS mounting board had hole alignment errors which took awhile to correct.

What's next on the agenda? Sail panels and lower rear seat side panels.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 15 Jul 2019 :  3:51:04 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: Monday 15 July 2019

The sail panels and lower rear seat side panels are installed. Check that off.

BTW, after installing the dome light I put my multimeter on the contacts--no juice! I couldn't believe it and double checked my multimeter. It works fine. No juice reading is accurate. The new contacts with light bulb in place worked fine a couple of weeks ago including both door switches. Electrical gremlins at work...I'll have to trace the wiring to the harness that is in the trunk. What nonsense!

Carpeting goes in next.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page

Red Horse
Cochise

346 Posts

Posted - 18 Jul 2019 :  04:59:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Regarding the dome light, there must a Murphy axiom to explain your lack of electricity.
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 19 Jul 2019 :  3:34:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Murphy's Law Corollary: If you check out a fix and everything works, rest assured the next time you check it, it won't.

With that said, it's time to upload some interior assembly photos with commentary.



After checking out all the wiring to the dome light and determining that the door switches work as an on/off switch, new contacts were attached to the wiring. The dome light without the headliner in place was fastened to the roof and a bulb installed. Yikes it worked. But have no fear, the above Murphy's Law Corollary came into play. After installing the headliner and the dome light as you see it. No juice! At least it looks nice. Gimme a break.







Finally rolling out the carpet....



Wrinkles in the carpeting from being boxed come out. Weights were used to help the flattening process. The carpeting out of the box is designed for an automatic console. The carpeting needed to be cut longer (toward the firewall) to fit around the manual shifter . Mounting brackets for the center console also were cut out--that's a must for either tranny. It takes some time positioning the carpet and locating the seat belt holes and bucket seat bolt holes, patience required.



Now it's starting to look like like an interior again. The Acoustic-Shield Heat Insulation Padding (HIP) did not interfere with the installation of the console. I was happy about that.







Hurray, a working center console "glove" box. Plenty of room for loose change and candy wrappers again!



This photo shows my extra temperature gauge. It also shows the carpeting under the pedals. What doesn't show was that the carpeting comes with jute padding in certain locations on the backside. There is some under the hump under the dash which I left--couldn't hurt--and some under the carpet on the drivers and passenger side. I removed all of the jute that is under the pedals and near the accelerator. The Acoustic-Shield HIP was more than enough. I did this to ensure that all pedals would travel as they should...unimpeded. Very important for the accelerator to have full movement.

I plan on getting floor mats to put down to keep the carpeting clean and fresh looking. However, I have yet to find a set that makes me want to buy them. My old mats can't be reused as they look like worn combat boots.


"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page

mike389
Big Trees

USA
609 Posts

Posted - 21 Jul 2019 :  9:47:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bill
lookin real good ! I have a set from Ames & very good quality carpet set with the arrow head logo .
I see on the T/A cat. pg. 45 real nice ones !!

Mike
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 22 Jul 2019 :  2:48:06 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: Monday 22 July 2019

All that is left to do with the interior is to clip on the plastic top window trim pieces (L and R sides) and fasten the L and R "A" pillar metal trim pieces. The buckets are in and it's a great feeling to sit in the TA with all new interior again.

I've begun working on the passenger door. The power window scissor mechanism will be cleaned up and lubed and the power door lock actuator will be checked for ease of operation. Also the door lock and door handle needs to be installed. This will take a while.

The pre-assembled Camel Tan doors panels ordered from Classic Industries need attention. The glue used to secure the vinyl onto the board isn't holding. It appears from my inspection on the passenger door panel, that adhesive was sprayed only on the panel not on the panel and the vinyl. If the adhesive was not allowed to dry before making contact with the vinyl this may be the reason why it is failing now. I'll used my 3M spray adhesive to secure the vinyl to the board. There is always something that needs attention. In addition, none of the holes for the metal and plastic fastener are pre-cut. There are perforations there but the enthusiast (me) needs to cut them and open them up.



"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 23 Jul 2019 :  3:32:00 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: 23 July 2019--MORE OF THE SAME NONSENSE

Today, I was focused on doing two things. First, to verify the smooth operation of the power window and power door lock actuator, passenger door. Second, provided everything was okay, to proceed and install the cylinder lock and the door handle.

Neither have been done!

Looked at the two baggies containing the door handles and locks and discovered that the outside gasket for the cylinder locks were slightly damaged and not worthy of re-use. I didn't have fresh gaskets so that fact stopped me in my tracks on doing that. However, I could install the door handle. Good idea, that too went south.

Some time back I decided to get new gaskets for the door handles to replace the 40 year old gaskets that worked just fine. My order for two door handle gaskets was filled by Classical Industries and their OER product. Today, I learned they don't work! Made of plastic overseas, the pieces are not straight and have a curve to them (unlike the originals) and the slots to fit the mechanism are narrow. I took one gasket and cut the slots to widen them and trimmed another area that was not correct either. After making those cuts, the curve of the product would not allow the gasket to sit correctly. Pushing down on one side caused the other side to pop up. JUNK! My solution is to re-use the original 40 year old door handle gaskets because they fit and still work fine after 4 decades.

I've purchased many parts from Classic Industries during my restoration project. Those made of plastic are of poor to non-usable quality. Front and rear bumper covers were the most expensive and they required extensive time and effort to get them to fit the car.

New cylinder lock gaskets should be delivered in a few days. When that happens things will get going again.




"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.

Edited by - Bill Boyle on 25 Jul 2019 2:54:30 PM
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 25 Jul 2019 :  3:31:39 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: 25 July 2019

More parts have been ordered to help me complete the car's interior.

The newest problem to solve is the sluggish operation of the power door lock actuators. The driver's side actuator was replaced several years ago with an AC Delco unit. The passenger side was never gotten to and I have a new replacement on hand to install.

This morning while testing the power door lock switch on the passenger side, two things were noticed. First, the lock/unlock is supposed to work both door simultaneously. The actuator on the driver's side moved but an insufficient amount to fully unlock the latch. The actuator on the passenger side did nothing. NOTHING! This is the one that needs to be replaced. The driver's side actuator is not moving enough to move the latching mechanism which tells me, it's all gunked up and needs to be cleaned and lubricated. Secondly, when I moved to the driver's side power door lock switch and plugged it in, two of the wires broke off. Those wires were barely attached. So, the dilemma is could this terminal be fixed or not? After studying the problem I surmised the terminal could not be fixed and reused. I'll have to find a LH side replacement.

The passenger side door panel has been prepped. Although the door panels came pre-assembled, all of the appropriate holes had to be cut into the panel. These included the rectangle for the power door lock switch, the larger rectangle hole for the door handle escutcheon, the 3 holes for the arm rest to mount to the door, and all of the cut outs for fasteners to secure the panel to the door. This endeavor took 90 minutes to complete one door. The old door panel was inspected and compared to the new one to ensure the holes cut into the vinyl were correctly located. So far so good.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 25 Jul 2019 :  9:11:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
A couple illustrative photos of the 5-prong plug receptacle (for the power door lock switch) that "lost" two wires today.



The green arrows show the two wires that came off the receptacle.



The orange with black stripe wire is the hot wire and attaches to the terminal that goes to hole 'A' on the receptacle. The power door lock switch plugs into this piece.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page

Red Horse
Cochise

346 Posts

Posted - 25 Jul 2019 :  10:19:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just read your 23 July post.Makes you wonder how the restorers can rebuild a car and get it in one of the big auction houses. What with all the junk parts ,maybe they only go with new old stock.
Got a few words into the posting said to myself, he'll say the parts don't fit. do you think all the suppliers get their parts from the same source ? So there is no choice or has mediocraty become the standard?
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 26 Jul 2019 :  4:43:07 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: Friday 26 July 2019

Today the passenger side power door lock actuator was removed and the new AC Delco unit installed.

The actuator is held in place with 2-1/4" x 0.500" rivets. A large rivet gun is required to mimic the factory installation. Instead, 2- 1/4" x 3/4" long hex bolts with washers and nuts were used to install the new unit.

The rivets were handled this way: Dremel with cutting wheel removed the small rivet nub protrusion. When the nub was gone, the rod of th rivet was punched out. Remainder was drilled out easily.

The rod that connects to the door latch was then removed, followed by the electrical connect located at the bottom of the unit. Thereafter, the mounting bracket was swapped over from the old unit to the new. The head of the hex bolt requires a 7/16 wrench. The lower hex bolt was installed first for best access; then the top.

One more thing. The window must be in the raised position to access the actuator.

Below are 9 photos for illustration.






























"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 28 Jul 2019 :  5:27:17 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: Sunday 28 July 2019

Installed the 'A' pillar metal trim and the side roof trim today. A little trimming of the 'A" pillar trim pieces was needed for two reasons: First, the dash cap takes up space so a mild contour change was necessary. Secondly, the dashboard, if some remember from earlier posts, that it was not accurately centered when the car was built in May 1979. There was a large gap on the driver's side 'A" pillar compared to the passenger side 'A" pilar. The shop that performed all the upholstery work for me last year also installed the dash cap without having to disassemble the dash and relocate it as I believed needed to be done. The skilled tech squeezed it into place. I could have corrected this factory defect, but didn't. In the event, a total replacement dash is secured by me in the future, I'll be sure to center the thing like the factory should have done.

A couple of more things knocked of my check list.

My 11-year old grandson saw the car today with the interior in place and said, "I've never seen the car looking like this before Grandpa." [He was 5 and doesn't remember.]

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 29 Jul 2019 :  10:17:14 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: Monday 29 July 2019

This afternoon my UPS driver brought more parts. In the box was a pair of outer door window sweeps with SS bead, several door cylinder lock gaskets and L and R hand arm rests. The arm rests are black and will be "dyed" Camel Tan to match my interior. However, they won't be dyed right away as the pieces smell very fresh and need to "out gas' before any prep is begun on them.

The order for a LH power door lock "pig tail" to replace the broken OEM plug (receptacle) is on back order so that will surely slow my progress on the electrical fix. Hopefully the vendor will be getting his parts shipment soon so I can get my part.

The RH sport mirror was cut and buffed, polished and installed today and will let me know, once again, that "objects in the mirror appear closer than they are."

My checklist is getting shorter.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 30 Jul 2019 :  4:41:45 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: 30 July 2019

I expected to install the cylinder lock and exterior door handle on the passenger door today. I'm batting .500. 1 out of 2. A couple of posts earlier addressed me re-using the old 40-year old door handle gaskets because the brand new reproduction gaskets from Classic Industries didn't work because they are not manufactured correctly--not straight, not cut right. The old ones didn't look good, so, I ordered 2 new GM door handle gaskets from Ames. They cost quite a bit, but I'm at the point where this little stuff can't delay me. Gaskets will be here in a couple of days.

As to the installation of the door lock. Installing it is tricky. First, in my case, I had to remove a little excess body filler around the hole to get the cylinder to fit. Once that was done, examining old photos helped me orient the arm attached to the cylinder to the bar that moves the lock--open and locked. The big problem came with my ridiculous attempt to squeeze my big hands between the glass to try and install the retaining clip. That was a non-starter. Needing smaller hands, I called on my wife as she is always game to help me out.

Once she knew what needed to be done, she grabbed the clip and slipped her hand down the top of the door. She managed to get the clip started but could not push it into place. The fit was very tight. Not knowing for sure what to do, we raised the window and that provided access from below for me to start the clip, and then with a long flat screwdriver, using it as a lever, successfully pushed the clip into place. The key works the mechanism just fine.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 31 Jul 2019 :  12:59:42 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: 31 July 2019

Decided to shorten the length of the bolts used to fasten the actuator to the passenger door. The 3/4" long bolts were a little long. Replaced the standard hex nuts with 2 hex nuts with nylon inserts and cut the bolts shorter with my Dremel cutting wheel.

Before:



After:


"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 02 Aug 2019 :  3:44:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: Friday 2 August 2019

On the 29th of July I wrote: "The order for a LH power door lock "pig tail" to replace the broken OEM plug (receptacle) is on back order so that will surely slow my progress on the electrical fix. Hopefully the vendor will be getting his parts shipment soon so I can get my part. "

With the back order spoiling my progress it was time to explore the possibity of fixing the driver's side OEM plug. The chore was to see if the back of the plug could be removed and later replaced, assuming the wires that broke off their respective terminals could be soldered back into place. I'm happy to state that, yes, I was able to remove the backing, access the terminals and solder the wires back into place. Most importantly, both power door lock switches work the actuators and the doors lock and open as designed.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 05 Aug 2019 :  4:21:19 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: 5 August 2019--I'm back on the passenger door.

Everything mechanical is operational. The outer window sweeps were installed and the roof window weatherstripping seal (gasket) was fitted into the channels and temporarily fastened to the car. This was done this way to see how the gasket sealed the window in the up position and what adjustments might be needed on the window so that it fits the seal well. In addition, all the previously applied weather stripping adhesive was removed from the passenger door so the new bottom door seal could be installed. New 3M adhesive was applied sparingly and the bottom door seal was installed this afternoon. Closing the door is now a challenge unlike before. With all new "puffy" gaskets in place it takes some force, muscle if you will, to close the door against all the new seals. For those of you interested, these seals are from Steele Rubber Products.

I have to laugh. After installing all new foam on all the seats front and rear, adding all the acoustic-shield insulation on the ceiling of the roof, plus the new window and doors gaskets, aside from sitting up higher in the seats, touching my long hair on the headliner, I'll have to run open headers just to hear the engine running. See what happens when you make changes!

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.

Edited by - Bill Boyle on 07 Aug 2019 10:39:39 AM
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 10 Aug 2019 :  5:36:20 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: Saturday 10 August 2019

The passenger door is done.

Here are a few pointers (tips).

My TA has power door locks. The panels purchased in Camel Tan (PUI product) match the upholstery and dyed plastic parts (rear lower panels, upper sail panels, package shelf, visors, headliner and dash board) very closely. The door panels come with a metal shoulder that is more rigid than the plastic shoulder used in the original panels. The door panels while assembled with interior side window sweeps, only have perforations for the clips and mounting hardware. All of these mounting locations must be cut out using a razor blade. While I had most of the original clips that were removed from the original panels and door, it was a good idea to purchase new hardware. It's not expensive and saves some time. New is good!

What was interesting was there was no perforations for the power door lock switches. If you have power door locks, save the original panels until the new panels are mounted. Knowing where the location of where to cut the new PUI door panel for the door locks was helpful. I took some measurements and made a template that I was able to position on the back of the passenger panel and mark for cutting with a razor blade.

The power door locks on my original panels have a rectangle steel frame that fits the rectangular hole in the panel. This frame should be reused on the new panel. It has 4 wings that can be slowly bent ro release it from the old panel and slowly bent to position it on the new panel. The power door lock switches are new replacements. My originals were questionable. There are clips on each side of the new switches which must pass through the metal frame and "pop" behind the metal frame to secure it to the panel. These clips prevent the switch from popping out of position. Personally, I don't like the arrangement and had trouble securing the switch to the panel. I learned that the electrical plug to the switch must be attached to the switch before the panel is positioned on the door. Be careful here because my fingers broke away the ground wire to the terminal in the plug this morning and that mistake stopped me in my tracks. Which takes me to another point; examine the wires to the plug carefully. Fix the wires as needed by soldering the wires back on to the original terminals if broken, or, add 60/40 solder to terminals to strengthen the connection between the wire and the terminal.

Once everything with the plug is sturdy, take the panel and plug in the plug to the switch. By all means, ensure the switch operates the door locks before doing anything else. Thereafter, proceed installing the panel. Start from the door latch and make sure the top of the panel sit down fully.

Installing and positioning some of the fasteners is required. Take your time and make sure everything lines up correctly. Leave the very bottom of the door for last. Do the lock side clips first, then the hinge side. Double check the bottom again and pop them into their respective holes. Install the arm rest and door handle escutcheon.

I'll be adding photos to illustrate.



"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.

Edited by - Bill Boyle on 11 Aug 2019 6:08:23 PM
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 12 Aug 2019 :  2:42:43 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Below are 8 photos to help illustrate my previous post.
























The door is complete but for the new arm rest which will be "dyed" Camel Tan. It's temporarily secured to the car to "air" out. Thereafter, the arm rest will be fully treated to get several applications of dye. Yes, I'm using adhesion promoter so the painted surface doesn't lift off.

I've begun working on the driver's door.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page

Brian R
Crazy Horse

USA
1724 Posts

Posted - 14 Aug 2019 :  3:21:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice work Bill !
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 16 Aug 2019 :  8:24:48 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: Friday 16 August 2019

Yesterday, the driver's door lock and door handle were installed. Today, the outer window sweep was installed. Things are moving along...or are they?

I noticed something very odd this morning. The rubber weather stripping that runs along the roof and down the 'A"pillar which was only pre-fitted, not fully installed, had broken apart just past midway on the 'A' pillar.

A photo was taken and sent off to Steele Rubber Products. in their response to me I learned that Steele doesn't manufacture these rubber pieces. Steele is requesting that the piece be retuned to them so they can deal with the vendor. I'm waiting for clarification on whether Steele wants me to remove the passenger side weather stripping too since both were packaged together.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.

Edited by - Bill Boyle on 16 Aug 2019 8:25:48 PM
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5288 Posts

Posted - 17 Aug 2019 :  4:36:23 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: 17 August 2019

Steele Rubber Products is sending me a new set of window weather stripping. Earlier today the driver's side, where the break was, and the passenger side weather stripping were taken off the car. Both pieces will be shipped back to Steele.

The driver's door panel is almost ready for mounting. All the necessary holes for hardware have been removed and the new power door lock switch was mounted in a different way than the passenger side. More on those details in a future post. Lubricating the window mechanism is on my to do list as well as mounting the water shield and the driver's mirror with cable control.

That's about it for now.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page
   Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Pontiac Street Performance © 2006-2017 Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.34 seconds. This Site Sponsored By:
Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05