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 Bill Boyle's 79 TA Restoration Project--Part 4
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Admin
Ye Olde Webmaster

861 Posts

Posted - 29 Jun 2019 :  4:29:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is the continuation thread to Parts 1, 2 and 3 of the TA project. The journey continues with Interior assembly and wrapping up dozens of loose ends and detailing to follow.


"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5264 Posts

Posted - 29 Jun 2019 :  6:14:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: Saturday, 29 June 2019

Today was laying out the heat shield and pre-fitting the many pre-cut pieces to the contour of the back seat cabin partition, and the flooring underneath the back seat. The pre-cut pieces are generally close but trimming was performed on most pieces to get a tighter fit.

BTW, trimming was tried with a sharp utility knife, using a piece of wood to bear down on. The jute backing is tough to cut that way so I gave up on that method. I then tried scissors and the first pair was too dull, a second pair cut just fine.

Enough is enough for today; I'll get back on it again tomorrow.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5264 Posts

Posted - 30 Jun 2019 :  1:01:14 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Below are 3 photos taken last night.







More fitting will take place this afternoon. One key thing is to locate all the bolt holes for the bucket seats and seat belts and mark and trim the insulation now. The new carpeting sits atop the insulation and bolts for the seats and seat belts need to be fed through the carpeting and the insulation into their respective threaded hole in the floor pan without complication.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Lee
Sitting Bull

186 Posts

Posted - 01 Jul 2019 :  05:42:55 AM  Show Profile  Visit Lee's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Great to see your steady progress, Bill! Keep up the great work!

CURRENT: '73 T/A clone, starting to get less boring!...
67 Firebird (sold) 11.27 @ 119.6 Feb. '05 issue HPP
69 Falcon wagon, 10.51 @ 130mph Feb. '10 issue PHR (sold)
72 Cutlass Convertible, first car, owned since '82, now with a 6.0 LS, mild, putting just under 400 hp/tq to the wheels.
www.LNLPD.com
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5264 Posts

Posted - 01 Jul 2019 :  11:08:50 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks Lee.

How are you coming along with the '73 FB?

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Lee
Sitting Bull

186 Posts

Posted - 01 Jul 2019 :  1:18:32 PM  Show Profile  Visit Lee's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Up and down, on the '73. I don't remember if I discussed my accident last year, I came really close to losing use of my right hand. I've come a long way though, and have built a motor and done a bunch of other work for a friends 67 LeMans - so I'm doing better :-)

I was going to yank my 455 to do some upgrades, but I had a chance to do some test fitting for a new gauge package from New Vintage USA. I just finished up on that project last week, and they are sending me the first set as a thank you, it is supposed to ship this week. Once the new gauges are installed and working properly, then I'll be yanking the engine. Dave Bisschop is working on some heads for me, so that should be happening later this year :-)


CURRENT: '73 T/A clone, starting to get less boring!...
67 Firebird (sold) 11.27 @ 119.6 Feb. '05 issue HPP
69 Falcon wagon, 10.51 @ 130mph Feb. '10 issue PHR (sold)
72 Cutlass Convertible, first car, owned since '82, now with a 6.0 LS, mild, putting just under 400 hp/tq to the wheels.
www.LNLPD.com
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5264 Posts

Posted - 02 Jul 2019 :  5:18:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Lee, don't think I was aware of the injury and how frightening that must have been for you. Sure glad you're on the road to recovery with your right hand.

Update: 2 July 2019--

Boy is it hot out. 88 degrees in my garage this morning at 9 am. Keeping the door shut and the portable AC unit running does little but feed Florida Power and Light. The unit isn't capable of cooling that much air when it reaches that temperature. All and all, I'll tough it out. Spraying 3M adhesive requires good ventilation so fans are running blowing lots of hot air around.

Making good progress on fitting the insulation although the job is taking far longer than expected. Fitting the insulation when it is dry (not ready to be glued down) and trimming it when it is dry eventually requires more trimming when the insulation is stuck in place with the spray adhesive. The padding sticks tight and fast to the metal and trimming is needed on the ends to get it just right. Jumping-jehoshaphat, that's what's taking so long.

The back seat area and the driver's side to the firewall is done. Currently working on the tunnel, trimming as I go. Overall it looks good and I do believe the cabin will be much quieter than it ever has been. The exhaust note will still be audible but quiet enough to listen to music and make out my wife telling me to lay of the fast starts. More photos to come....

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.

Edited by - Bill Boyle on 02 Jul 2019 5:19:38 PM
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5264 Posts

Posted - 04 Jul 2019 :  4:56:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: 4 July 2019--Happy Independence Day

The interior of the car, that is, the roof, floor pan, back and package shelf are all padded with insulation. It took a while...but it's done.

I have heat insulation padding for the trunk as well but will not install it now (or possibly ever). The TA never came with a super nice carpet, just a felt type black carpet with some jute pieces attached to it. The carpet in the car was discolored and pretty ratty so it was trashed a while back. Unless there is better carpet that fits the contours, I'll just seek a replacement felt carpet and I would get the replacement to see how it covers before any effort is made to insulate the trunk.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5264 Posts

Posted - 05 Jul 2019 :  3:24:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: 5 July 2019

As mentioned in my previous post, the interior is completely insulated. However, that isn't exactly accurate. The doors will not get any Dynamat on the backside of the door skin. The doors are heavy enough with out adding more weight to them, besides, the full kit that was purchased doesn't come with anything to do with the backside of the door skins. So, the heck with it.

Thinking about the time it took to install the heat insulation padding (HIP) I soon realized there is a learning curve involved. As I got further along, how things were done changed. In other words, I got smarter and more efficient as more time and experience were gained.

Several things I want to point out. This info could help some one in the future and save them some time and frustration. First off, while the HIP is pre-cut. Trimming to make the HIP fit correctly in your car is necessary. Just because it is pre-cut doesn't mean it is a simple peel and stick--it isn't--far from it. Another thing is that just because the pieces come in large sizes, cut from a machine, that doesn't preclude you from cutting the big pieces into 3 or 4 pieces so its easier to handle. In fact, I recommend doing it. Full coverage is what you want, and being able to fit the smaller pieces together isn't difficult as the seams are tied together with the foil tape that is provided in the package. Overall, the HIP looks slick when finished.

Another worthwhile tip is this: Applying the 3M spray adhesive doesn't require multiple coats. One light coat for the floor pan pieces is okay. Two coats is good for the roof pieces, but no more. The ultimate trick is allowing the adhesive to dry on the pad and the metal. Not tacky to the touch but dry. When tacky the HIPs are difficult to align and a misstep causes immediate dislocation of the HIP and more trimming is likely for other pieces to fit. The key is to allow the adhesive to dry. Aligning the pieces is easy as there is less bite when the two adhesive parts contact one another. If wrong, it can be removed and repositioned. I learned this by trial and error. I'm passing what I learned on to others.

One of the hardest things I found in laying down the HIP and getting it adhered to the floor was locating all the pieces and trying to figure out where they go. The labeling diagram from the company is not clear and because of it, quite time consuming. This is a short fall with their product. The pieces diagram could be much better.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.

Edited by - Bill Boyle on 06 Jul 2019 07:45:50 AM
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5264 Posts

Posted - 06 Jul 2019 :  10:45:31 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Below is video footage taken yesterday of the Heat Insulation Padding (HIP). The camel carpet should contour nicely to it.

http://www.pontiacstreetperformance.com/graphix/IMG_5174.MOV

The wheel well pads L and R (black in color) were left intact as they were tight to the wheel well. All other OEM padding was removed to insure the floor pan was solid (it was). The floor pan was cleaned and dried before the Dynamat strips were installed and re-cleaned and dried before the HIP was glued down.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.

Edited by - Bill Boyle on 06 Jul 2019 10:51:15 AM
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5264 Posts

Posted - 08 Jul 2019 :  1:44:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: Monday, 8 July 2019--Prepping the headliner for installation

My TA has no T-tops, it's a full roof car. The new headliner vinyl (in Camel Tan) is mounted on ABS plastic. In contrast, the OEM mounting board for the TA was a thick, highly compressed cardboard. The OEM vinyl headliner foam backing broke down and was replaced by me in 1993. I bought heavy vinyl material in dark tan at a fabric shop and glued it on to the OEM mounting board. This fix worked just fine--maybe 20 years--then the cardboard broke down and the mounting board began to sag. The vinyl was still in great condition.

The new headliner is a perforated vinyl covering like the OEM and has a foam backing that is glued to the ABS plastic mounting board. There is plenty of excess vinyl material which needs to be trimmed off, wrapped around the edges of the mounting board and glued to the back.

Prepping the new headliner involved doing just that. Trimming, mitering the corners and gluing it down to the backside of the board took about an hour. X cuts were made initially where the visors mount as well as the dome light. These locations are cut outs into the ABS plastic mounting board so trimming was relatively simple. Material was also removed on each side of the board where the seat belt mechanism is located. Both areas were trimmed and glued.

Next up--installation.













"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5264 Posts

Posted - 08 Jul 2019 :  7:05:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: late afternoon on Monday, 8 July 2019

Reinstalling the old OEM cardboard mounting board in '93 was a breeze. This time my encounter was different for one reason--the heat insulation padding (HIP) installed on the ceiling of the roof didn't allow the new ABS mounting board to get close enough to the ceiling--in other words, the bow wasn't as great, hence the mounting board wound up being 1/4" too long and the board interfered with the 6 rear Phillips head screws that fasten the rear molding to the roof which holds up the rear of the mounting board.

To remedy the problem, I located the 6 screw holes in the molding and located those areas on the mounting board. Thereafter, a 1/4" x 1/2" long notch was cut out of the rear section of the ABS mounting board at the screw locations. With the assistance of my wife (she's terrific) we installed the front of the headliner first locating the visor holes with the roof, bent the mounting board and slipped it into the rear trim molding. 4 of 6 rear trim screws were tightened to keep the headliner secure. A temporary stanchion was also put in place to provide upward pressure on the middle of the headliner so it won't sag. Visors and dome light will be tackled next.

Making great progress--but my back is sore. I'll be glad when the headliner installation is done.


"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5264 Posts

Posted - 13 Jul 2019 :  5:08:33 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: 13 July 2019

Today, my son helped me complete the headliner installation. It should have been easy but wasn't. The aftermarket ABS mounting board had hole alignment errors which took awhile to correct.

What's next on the agenda? Sail panels and lower rear seat side panels.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5264 Posts

Posted - 15 Jul 2019 :  3:51:04 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Update: Monday 15 July 2019

The sail panels and lower rear seat side panels are installed. Check that off.

BTW, after installing the dome light I put my multimeter on the contacts--no juice! I couldn't believe it and double checked my multimeter. It works fine. No juice reading is accurate. The new contacts with light bulb in place worked fine a couple of weeks ago including both door switches. Electrical gremlins at work...I'll have to trace the wiring to the harness that is in the trunk. What nonsense!

Carpeting goes in next.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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