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Admin
Ye Olde Webmaster

844 Posts

Posted - 14 Jul 2007 :  06:33:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've realized that despite the numerous topics and questions raised on this board, many great tips and lessons learned, are forgotten. If reduced to writing or saved by the person individually, in a personal folder, that's good, but sometimes, even if we do that we can't find the information when we need it. This is why I'm creating a new topic, one to stay on top of the board so people can add engine building tips, tricks, things to double check, check lists etc, for building, rebuilding and modifying our Pontiac engines.

Anyone with definitive experience is invited to post. The category is not for theory, or "I believe" or "I think" this or that. This is true, real life experience tips and lessons learned. Its knowledge to be passed along so others will not make similar mistakes. It will help us enjoy our Pontiac hobby more, save us all a few frustrations and some hard earned cash in the process.

Please keep your posts short and to the point. Thanks to all of you in advance,

Bill Boyle

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

Admin
Ye Olde Webmaster

844 Posts

Posted - 14 Jul 2007 :  06:38:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Elongate push rod holes in heads.

When reconditioning those heads, be sure to elongate the push rod holes to allow for future use of 1.65 ratio rockers. Grinding the holes wider and longer must be done with the heads off the engine. Grind away material toward the center of the engine.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4793 Posts

Posted - 14 Jul 2007 :  06:44:25 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Reusing stock retainers with new springs.

Stock retainers using stock 7 degree keepers (locks) may be reused over and over and will fit most aftermarket valve springs. Not using the stock oil shields adds .030" to the installed height.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4793 Posts

Posted - 14 Jul 2007 :  06:50:49 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Take photos make drawings...

Before engine disassembly, take photos before, during and after. Photos provide easy and helpful reference on part location, condition, and for reassembly.

Parts in zip lock bags with short description.

Use zip lock plastic baggies for all bolts and small parts and include a description of where they go. Similarly, make a quick illustration and include in the parts bag. Store these baggies/parts in a designated box. Stay organized.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Brian Baker
Mongo

USA
1050 Posts

Posted - 24 Jul 2007 :  12:33:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
MEASURE EVERYTHING !!!

My wifes uncle just rebuilt the 318 in his mid-90's Dodge truck. It had 150K miles on it. He put the same size bearing back in it that came out of it, but didn't measure anything (story sound familiar?). He called me on the phone yesterday for my opinion on why his oil pressure drops to zero after it warms up. After much questioning, he told me he didn't measure anything, he just replaced teh bearings with the same size that came out of it. Big mistake.

Will Rogers never met a liberal.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4793 Posts

Posted - 31 Jul 2007 :  08:08:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Stuff/block orfices to avoid debri/parts/tools.

When disassembling part of you engine to perform a cam change, be sure to place a mechanic's rag or paper towels between the oil pan and the opening where the timing case fits. This is to prevent foreign objects (including small tools) to fall into the pan. All openings, such as the distributor hole, intake ports should also be covered or clogged with rags for the same reason.

If you have heads to install, be sure all openings are clean and the mating surface has nothing sticking to it.


"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Jim Hand
Buffalo

65 Posts

Posted - 05 Aug 2007 :  8:29:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Fluorescent lamp bulbs.

I have found an excellent use for the new coiled fluorescent lamp bulbs. They don't make equal light in normal fixtures but are excellent in trouble lights, either extension or plug in types. They don't generate heat and so won't burn your hands, accidentally burn seat covers, steering wheels, accelerator pedals, or other places we tend to place/hang them when we are trying to see to finish a job. Do get the 100 watt sizes and they make good light within the metal reflectors of our trouble lights.
Jim Hand
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Jim Hand
Buffalo

65 Posts

Posted - 10 Aug 2007 :  3:39:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Inexpensive floor jack protector

If you use a floor jack with the typical lifting cup with four ears sticking up, here is a very easy and practical mod. Make a circle of 3/4" plywood that will fit within the cup. The plywood will set slightly above the cup ears and acts as a cushion when lifting. The jack is far less likely to slip on the surface being lifted. And as a bonus, it seldom scratches or otherwise screws up the paint on the surface being lifted.

The plywood can be easily removed if you need the bare cup fto lift something like an A arm. But I seldom use the metal cup bare so have dropped a little RTV into the cup and onto the plywood to keep it in place when not in use.

Jim Hand
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4793 Posts

Posted - 20 Aug 2007 :  08:26:55 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Stay organized.

Even if you're midway in doing something and have to break for many hours or perhaps a day or more, gather up all the tools you've being using and return them to their cabinet, draw, or peg board. It's far easier to locate tools when they are centrally located. This is a good habit to adopt. It saves time and relieves you of trying to remember where you put that wrench, socket or drive etc.

Use and care of measuring instruments.

With measuring instruments never leave them laying about. Measure and return them to their special draw or designated box. They are costly and subject to being damaged or lost pretty easily. BTW, you're torque wrench qualifies as a measuring instrument as well and should be given the same care. Never use the torque wrench like a breaker-bar. Doing so is a sure way to get a false reading the next time you need to torque something accurately. Better safe than sorry.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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drobe2
Cochise

USA
333 Posts

Posted - 20 Aug 2007 :  5:07:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Adhesive to keep nuts/hardware in place

Eleven Finger Mechanic. Ever have a problem holding a bolt or nut inplace where the hand or finger will not reach? Stuff the socket with duct tape so that the hardware will stick to it. using the socket and extension to get reach in to get the hardware threads started on the threads. Have used a deep socket to get a better grip to sping the sut/bolt. Same thing to remove hardware to keep it from falling once removed. This was an adaptive trick used while working aircraft aeras where magnetic tools were not allowed. You think a car had tight places to work, try an aircraft.
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Will
Cochise

Zimbabwe
285 Posts

Posted - 14 Sep 2007 :  12:41:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Buy A GOOD Engine Stand!

The cheap 3-leg stands are dangerous and barely adequate to support a fully dressed Pontiac engine. They can tip over easily if one of the wheels catches or hits something while rolling it around with an engine on it. The last thing you want is 600 lbs of iron crashing into the garage floor, or landing on your foot, or smashing into your car, or .... etc.

A good 4-leg engine stand with 1000 lb capacity isn't that much more expensive and is well worth it.

Not qualified to answer questions about engines over 425 HP.
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Will
Cochise

Zimbabwe
285 Posts

Posted - 14 Sep 2007 :  12:48:39 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Check Crankshaft Main Journal Concentricity/Runout

A good way to make sure the main journals of your crankshaft are perfectly round and all on the same centerline (yes, it's possible for them not to be!) is with a dial indicator on a magnetic base. Lay the crank in the block with only the upper halves of the #1 & #5 main bearings installed. Make sure those journals and the bearings are well lubed with assembly lube. Setup a dial indicator on a magnetic base so the tip of the indicator rides at the edge of the journal so that it will miss the oil hole. Rotate the crank by hand using steady, even pressure and watch the needle on the dial indicator. It shouldn't fluctuate, at least not by even so much as a needle width.

If you don't have a dial indicator and magnetic base (they're pretty cheap), you can also check using plastiguage though not as accurately: Check all the journals with the plastigage and record the results. Now, rotate the crank 1/4 turn and check again. If the results are different, there is a problem.

Not qualified to answer questions about engines over 425 HP.
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Will
Cochise

Zimbabwe
285 Posts

Posted - 14 Sep 2007 :  12:58:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Oil Pump Preparation--preinstallation

Brand new oil pumps can have grit and debris from the machining operations left inside them, so it's always a good idea to completely disassemble them and clean them thoroughly.

This is a good time to check the gear endplay as well. With the gears installed in the pump housing lay a straight edge across the sealing surface of the bottom plate on the pump body and use feeler gauges to measure the clearance between the gears and the bottom plate. It should be in the .003" - .005" neighborhood.

If you want to bump the pressure relief up about 10psi for high RPM use, especially on large journal engines, place a 1/8" hardened steel shim or washer behind the pressure relief spring in the plug that screws into the pump body. This will raise the max output pressure of a 60 psi pump to about 70 psi.

Always use some method to positively retain the pickup tube and screen assembly. Some people tack weld the tube to the pump. If you don't have access to a welder or don't want to risk distorting the pump body with heat, use safety wire. A set-screw through the collar for the tube on the pump body into the tube itself can also be used, but this would require drilling and tapping the pump body prior to cleaning it. If you do this, be sure to use locktite and/or a lock washer on the set screw.

Not qualified to answer questions about engines over 425 HP.
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pontiacracer
Tribal Scout

USA
7 Posts

Posted - 01 Oct 2007 :  9:36:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Intake bolts/ Intake installation

Before you tighten down a pontiac intake manifold, put all the bolts in place but dont tighten them yet. You must first tighten thebolt that goes into the front of the manifold. This bolt makes the seal between the manifold and the timming chain cover. There is a rubber ring that goes in between them. I put rtv on the ring then I tighten that front bolt so it pulls the intake manifold and the timming cover together. Then you can start tightening down your manifold bolts.
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sfenley
Buffalo

USA
54 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2008 :  4:03:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Separate Water Passage from Intake

I cut the water passage off so that front bolt doesn't misalign the ports, I have a small fortune in port work and that would just flush it down the toilet!. I have a question about installing the dipstick; do you have to have it pressed in or can you just lift the motor up and tap it in with a hammer. I don't want to screw it up because it cost about $70 from Kauffman Racing.
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Mark S.
Cochise

USA
432 Posts

Posted - 20 Mar 2008 :  11:29:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
How to mount a factory windage tray on an engine not originally equipped with one.

Only IF your main caps have the bosses on them that aren't tapped:

#3 cap has holes drilled in it to secure the lower dip stick tube.
Temporarily install #3 cap on #2 web, bolt it down snug.
Mount windage tray (3/4 tray or "short" tray) to the #3 cap using the front tray holes.
Carefully center punch #4 cap on the un-tapped bosses through the rear mounting holes in the tray.
Un-bolt #3 cap and replace the #2 cap on it's web.
Remove #4 cap and install #3 cap.
Again mount windage tray to the #3 cap, this time using the rear tray holes.
Carefully center punch #2 cap on the un-tapped bosses through the front mounting holes in the tray.
Once finished, you should have #2 & #4 caps center punched.
Re-install all the caps in their proper place and verify the tray is centered & your center punch marks are in the right place.
If all is aligned, you're ready to drill & tap (use a drill press).
Tap the holes for 5/16 - 18 & use some grade 8 bolts & lock washers. You may need to use shims to get rod bolt clearance on some combos.
You may need to change the lower dip stick tube to the "tray" equipped style (without the mounting strap, that secures to #3 cap) since the strap may interfere with the tray. As always, each combo is different, so be sure to verify clearances around your rotating assembly.


If your caps do not have the bosses, you could use the "studded" head bolts on the #2 & #4 mains and drill and then mount the tray onto the studs, but that will take a lot of trial fitting to get right.

PSP Member since 1996

Never enough cubes...

"The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." - Albert Einstein

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Taman
Red Bird

USA
844 Posts

Posted - 24 Sep 2008 :  3:57:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
When using Allen wrenches. To keep the bolt on the wrench, use a piece of plastic wrapped over the wrench. This will keep the bolt from coming off the wrench until you want it to.

Everything Under The Sun Is Intune
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sixt8bird
Chief Many Horses

USA
1114 Posts

Posted - 06 Oct 2008 :  11:36:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit sixt8bird's Homepage  Reply with Quote
New Pontiac Rope Rear Main Seal.

quote:
Originally posted by 1966lemans

Is their any neoprene main bearing seal replacements that will work instead of the rope style for my 326 I am rebuilding??


They now make a great carbon fiber rope seal as there seem to be many problems with the neopreme seal.

Heres the seal you need to get!!!

New carbon graphite composite rope style rear main seal. As many of you already know, the main rope seals that come in the Felpro and Victor gasket sets are worthless since the EPA mandated the removal of asbestos from them. The neoprine rear seals work in some applications, but not all. So, for those stubborn rear main leaks that we all thought we had to live with, we have a solution. Cost is $19.99 plus shipping and handling. If you purchase three or more, we will pay the shipping. Please indicate year and engine size when ordering.

Thanks,

Don Johnston
DCI Motorsports LLC
(330) 628-3354
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Vid
Kicking Horse

USA
1685 Posts

Posted - 20 Aug 2009 :  9:22:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Carefully inspect the oil pump driveshaft

When assembling the motor, carefully inspect the oil pump driveshaft (between the oil pump and distributor) for cracks and straightness. I discovered a crack in mine on the distributor end. New replacements are inexpensive and easy to aquire. Also make sure the shaft is completely seated on the oil pump.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4793 Posts

Posted - 07 Apr 2010 :  09:44:42 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Installing Tube Headers

Before installing tube heads check the flange with a straight edge to determine whether there will be a fit problem. Excessive welds on the tube to flange may prevent a leak free seal if they are uneven. Removing some of the weld with a file to make things more even will promote a sealing. Also, prior to engine start, use a feeler gauge to see if the seal between the flange-gasket-head is tight. Starting the engine with a leakl could very easily damage the header gasket. I recommend using new SS header bolts to ensure the edges on the bolts are square and not rounded. Being able to tighten header bolts is a must. Ensure those bolts will thread smoothly ahead of the installation.

REMFLEX header gaskets provide substantial crush and will likely handle many minor imperfections with the header flange welds. They can be purchased online from Remflex and are well worth the investment. They worked for me.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4793 Posts

Posted - 07 Apr 2010 :  10:07:43 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Engine Start-up--battery/ground checks and starting fluid

If your car battery is brand new it will be charged. If your car battery has not been used it will need a full charge to start the engine. Charge it up. Be certain you have all the negative grounds from the engine to the chassis secured and that your battery is properly grounded to the engine.

Assuming your ignition is properly set and in working order, shoot a few squirts of starting fluid (heptane/Either) into the carb. Use sparingly as it is highly combustible. Play it safe--Always have an ABC rated fire extinguisher on the ready when firing up a new engine.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4793 Posts

Posted - 01 Mar 2012 :  8:14:06 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Sealing up the Pontiac

Jim Lehart at Central Virginia Machine Service provides expert advice on the subject. To lengthy to post here, It can be found in the tech articles on the site. For your convenience click on this link.

http://www.boyleworks.com/ta400/psp/Sealit.html


"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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67GTO4SPD
Tribal Scout

13 Posts

Posted - 09 Mar 2013 :  6:39:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
White Pipe Cleaners

Before installing a new, used, or reground crank, I use white pipe cleaners after using my engine cleaning brushes. Even after using engine brushes, you be surprised at how dirty the oil passages can be. The white pipe cleaners will show up dirt, grease, and most importantly metal particles better than the black brushes can. They also work great on pushrods holes. On bigger passages, I twist a few of them to together to increase the diameter of the cleaner. I got this trick from a guy that builds late model dirt track racing engines engines many years ago.

'67 GTO 400 H.O. 4 speed
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Blued and Painted
Chief PONTIAC

USA
3404 Posts

Posted - 03 Jun 2013 :  11:26:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Don't store a fan clutch laying flat on the bolt flange (hub). The oil can leak out.


Bull Nose Formula/ 461/ Q-Jet/
TH400/ 3.08 8.5 / R44TS.

Edited by - Blued and Painted on 03 Jun 2013 11:27:18 AM
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cortcomp
Coyote

USA
5335 Posts

Posted - 03 Jun 2013 :  12:53:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit cortcomp's Homepage  Reply with Quote
really? i have done that, i bet that's why the one i had leaked and died early.

I also didn't know you're not supposed to lift boosters out of the box by the brake pedal pushrod, i had done that once before too, and that same booster was leaking later about 1K miles. Why doesn't it say that on the box!?!?
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4793 Posts

Posted - 18 Aug 2013 :  08:41:07 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Paint those heads and fasteners

Don't skimp on adequately painting those heads (block) and all fasteners with engine enamel. Experience (mine) has shown that too light of a coating (to few coats) will not hold up to a high humidity environment. Head bolts that are exposed to the elements will rust quickly without a good coat of engine enamel. Don't think those nice looking ARP head bolts will stay nice and black. Paint them.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Miles
Sitting Bull

Canada
138 Posts

Posted - 26 Oct 2013 :  2:24:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Measure everything the machine shop touched. Don't take the machinist word that it was done to spec or done correctly. Most machinist are pros who know their stuff, some aren't and everyone makes a mistake now and then.

Measure the crank rear seal surface for roundness and spec. Sometimes overlooked when mains are done.
Check the crank rear seal surface serrations, ones too aggressive will file down the seal.

Check the rear seal groove in the cap and block, excessive or poorly done main bearing bore machining could result in the groove being smaller than spec and/or not on the same centerline as the crank.

Check the mating surface of the caps are 90 degrees to the bolt holes. A number four cap that was shaved at an angle other than 90 degrees will cause the thrust bearing to bind on the crank.

After the cam bearings are installed make sure the oil holes line up with the oil passages.

Check a new cam for runout at the center journal.

Measue all new parts, just because a bearing says it's 10 under doesn't mean it is.

Use of a rod-cap separator to remove cap from rod after measuring for bearing to journal clearance makes the job a lot easier.

Tell the machinist before he starts what you want for clearances and dimensions.

This thread is a good Idea, I learned all the above the hard way.
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Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
4793 Posts

Posted - 20 Nov 2013 :  10:33:15 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
3M safety mask for solvent protection

If you are using various solvents in the garage to clean parts, remove paint, or spraying paint, aerosol or paint gun, use a 3M OSHA approved mask to protect you lungs from those nasty solvents. Breathing in lacquer thinners, alcohol, ketones...can make you light headed but can also effect your mucous membranes and weaken the passages. Long exposure can damage your throat and lungs.

When spraying, be certain to evacuate the paint fumes. Use a fan and open the garage door and windows for fresh air and ventilation. If you have solvents on a rag or towel be sure to put them in a bin with a lid on it. Solvent left on rags and within close proximity to you can make you real dopey.

Take this advice seriously. Your nose, throat , lungs and brain will appreciate it.

Bill

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
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Miles
Sitting Bull

Canada
138 Posts

Posted - 15 Dec 2013 :  12:44:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
X2
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67drake
Sitting Duck

Azerbaijan
1501 Posts

Posted - 15 Dec 2013 :  12:57:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kind of along the same lines as Bill's post. Something I never knew but just found out recently that I read on another forum-
Never weld or braze on a part that you have used "brake clean" on! The vapor given off when the brake clean is vaporized is lethal! I guess just a small puff of the vapor is enough to kill you. I'm surprised I had never heard of this before.


71' GTO Original 400 M20 3.23 posi
13.95@102.1 MPH on street tires
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cortcomp
Coyote

USA
5335 Posts

Posted - 15 Dec 2013 :  3:46:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit cortcomp's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I read an article on that and yes, it's dangerous. Don't hold me to it, but i think non-chlorinated brake cleaner is safe, or use carb cleaner.
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Merrik66
Cochise

USA
370 Posts

Posted - 25 Dec 2013 :  10:57:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
All of a sudden the brakleen thing makes me nervous. We used to use it in a diesel automotive shop many years ago. I still use it...frequently. I've cleaned up warm motors finding oil leak origins and there are times when if it's hot (like hitting an exhaust or intake manifold) it will steam and yes, it's a powerful odor. I had always made earnest attempts to make sure I don't put myself in a position to get a full huff of it but I'll be a little more prudent after reading the above post.
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cortcomp
Coyote

USA
5335 Posts

Posted - 26 Dec 2013 :  10:30:47 AM  Show Profile  Visit cortcomp's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Below is the article that made me aware...apparently 4ppm is enough to kill you! Scary stuff. The only good part is that you need argon to make the reaction happen, which, unless welding, you're pretty safe from. As i understand it, R12 and other older refrigerants burning will produce it too. I guess they used to leak detect R12 with a torch and some kind of suction hose and it would make the gas. That all of course is phased out.

When i had a restaurant/bar going, our old freezer and cooler walk ins were r12 and one of them sprung a pretty good leak in the line and we lose all the R12 into the kitchen/storage area. Looking back, if we had some pilots or burners going at the time, i guess it could have wiped out or messed up most of the staff in the kitchen!

http://www.brewracingframes.com/id75.htm

Edited by - cortcomp on 26 Dec 2013 10:32:56 AM
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Merrik66
Cochise

USA
370 Posts

Posted - 27 Dec 2013 :  11:36:12 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Super scary. I do some occasional mig welding with 75/25 mix. I'll make sure I NEVER use brakleen to clean metal beforehand. I very well could have in the past. Maybe that would explain why I have 5 projects and none of them are close to completion.
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Bob Kaplan
Cochise

USA
417 Posts

Posted - 27 Dec 2013 :  4:44:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
All the old chlorine based freons are very deadly when in contact with a flame.

I remember brazing an a/c line in an attic and there was still a small amount of R 22
venting at the connection. Very scary stuff. I had to get to fresh air ASAP.

Hey that explains why I'm so f;/k up.


The surgeon general said nothing about smokin a chevy...

Edited by - Bob Kaplan on 27 Dec 2013 9:03:48 PM
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Blued and Painted
Chief PONTIAC

USA
3404 Posts

Posted - 28 Dec 2013 :  12:34:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Back in the old'den days before freon recovery was common, a fellow teck decided to put the service hose in the throat of the carb with the engine running, and dump the freon. The car still ran smooth but began filling the shop with an off white cloud of smoke . Knowing what was up, i pulled the service hose form the carb, told Dyno Dwane to turn off the car and run for your life. Everyone was OK and Dwane got some real world schooling on the dangers of A/C work.


Bull Nose Formula/ 461/ Q-Jet/
TH400/ 3.08 8.5 / R44TS.

Edited by - Blued and Painted on 28 Dec 2013 12:36:22 PM
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bluebird
Cochise

USA
292 Posts

Posted - 05 Jun 2015 :  9:10:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here is something I found out the hard way: After buying a 455 that was "rebuilt" and sitting for years. I pulled it apart and went through everything. I even put new clevite bearings in it. I wiped the engine down with rags and tried to keep dirt out. After installing the engine and running it. I changed the oil 3 times within 500 miles. After hearing some engine noise and was disappointed with performance, I decided to pull the engine and build it my way. Upon disassembly, I found broken seal retainers under the valve covers and some on top of the pistons, hence the noise I heard. I brought it to a machinist/engine builder to zero deck and balance new forged components. He pulled the engine apart and found a lot of dirt on the bottom of the oil pan and one rod bearing on the edge of destruction, with several more pitted. He then asked me if I had cleaned the oil galleys? I didn't even know where they were or how to do it. You have to remove freeze plugs near the cam timing chain and run a brush in the galley.
The moral of the story: Hot tank an engine and clean oil galleys, and check valve height. Or you may be in for a surprise. This was my first engine build, but take one thing for granted and it's all for nothing. Clean everything and check everything.
Or just have an experienced engine builder do it and save yourself headaches, time, and money.

"Experience is the best teacher, unfortunately, it's the costliest!"
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Sparafucile
Sitting Bull

158 Posts

Posted - 06 Jun 2015 :  09:43:50 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I agree. Anyone that needs a new engine should get a Chevy SBC.

As a service to the community, I'll just collect all the old Pontiac blocks, uh, you know... to make sure they are taken care of it an environmentally sound way. Yeah, that the ticket.

Tommy Flanagan
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