Pontiac Street Performance
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password

 All Forums
 General Discussion
 THE NEUTRAL ZONE
 Rifles, shotguns and pistols
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Author  Topic Next Topic  

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5024 Posts

Posted - 25 Mar 2018 :  12:57:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Around 10 years of age my Dad showed me the rudiments of marksmanship and gun safety. He taught me using a .22 caliber rifle. He taught me about safely handling this weapon and not to point it at anything I didn't intend to shoot. Ammo for this rifle belonged to him as did the rifle itself.

When I was about 12 years of age one of my older cousins showed me how to shoot a 20 gage shotgun. We fired it at objects 30 feet away. It was fun and the recoil was surprising to me after shooting only .22 caliber shorts, longs and long rifle ammo. The following year as I recall, my cousin let me shoot his .222 Remington. This was the first centerfire rifle cartridge I ever fired. I liked as recoil was light and the rifle shot accurately.

Some time between those events mentioned above, my Dad purchased a Remington .22 pump for me. I would shoot it exclusively at my cousin's property. They had 70 acres of woodlands. Visiting my cousins was always special. It was visiting with them that I purchased my first box of .22 ammo. I was maybe 12 at the time.

Since that time, I have fired anywhere between 4-5 thousand rounds through my pump .22. It is still fun to shoot. Shooting and accuracy has always been the feature I was after. Being a crack shot was important to me.

My interest is largely in rifle shooting, not hunting. Note, I have yet to mention pistols. While I had play guns, packing two 6 shooters as a elementary school kid, and playing Cowboys and Indians with friends during the 50s, pistols never were my thing. And just like in the movie Quincy Down Under starring Tom Selleck, Selleck's character preferred his long gun and he "didn't say he didn't know how to use 'em." I do have them, practice with them, and have become mildly proficient with them. My preference is very much in the long gun.

My largest caliber rifle is chambered in .338 Winchester Magnum. I never fired it at anything other than paper and tin cans. I bench rested this high powered rifle and got into reloading because of the cost. It's a arm bruiser. My other rifles are more manageable. Two are 22-250s another is a very accurate .270. All have been bench rested and non have been fired at an animal. Placing 5 rounds in the diameter of a quarter at 200 yards--that's fun for me. All of these are reloaded--again because of cost. It's fun to work on different loads and try them out.

Not too long ago, I bought a "black" rifle. It is .223 or 5.56mm. While it came with a 20 round mag, none of my guns except the little .22 have been loaded to fire in rapid succession. One can't be two accurate that way--and that's my thing. The "black" rifle came with iron sights, just like most of my other rifles came out of the box, yet, this gun, like my others needs a good scope so I can "plink" with it as I do with all of my other firearms.

At age 12 I became a Jr Member of the NRA. I still have that patch which my Mom sewed on my sweat shirt back then. Later in life, because of my interest in shooting, I became an NRA member, and finally a Life Member.

Should all US Citizens own a firearm? No, but they have the right to own one unless the law says they can't for some particular reason. Should "black" rifles, considered by many as pseudo "assault" rifles be legally prohibited from being used, and or purchased because they have been used to murder innocent people? That's a tough one.

I have no idea how many "black" rifles have been sold to the public in the past 40 years or more, but there must be millions in the hands of private US citizens. Placing a prohibition on using them, that is, to have them out in public or outside of your property would not effect the 2nd Amendment, but it would cut down on usage. But doing that, prohibiting their use, would that prevent a "nut job" or a criminal from attacking and murdering innocent people? Probably not. That's the problem in a nutshell. Criminal and "nut jobs" would still do their thing.

Prohibition never stopped the consumption of alcohol. In fact, it provided the impetus for underground and black market "criminal" behavior. Law abiding people were effected through the US and millions were relieved when prohibition ended.

Controlling the use of weapons might be legal and not deemed to be unconstitutional under the 2nd Amendment, but controlling use would largely be ineffectual. Confiscating "black" rifles that have been owned legally by millions of law abiding people isn't constitutional and will never happen.

The solution to "black" rifle violence upon innocent people isn't a "one button" fix. I see nothing wrong with a waiting period to purchase a firearm, and have no qualms about preventing a vendor from selling a pistol, rifle or shotgun to a person under 21 who is not holding a valid military ID card and who has cleared all state and federal background checks.

The problem of using firearms against others in a offensive (vs defensive role) manner will continue by law breakers, no matter what is done to stymie the use of firearms.


"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.

Blued and Painted
Chief PONTIAC

USA
3503 Posts

Posted - 26 Mar 2018 :  10:54:02 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Most all firearms in police evadance lockers are of the cheap Saturday night special hand gun variety. Virtually no top shelf 1911's, colt revolvers or ar-15's are found. Law abiding citizens with a little investment/disposable income buy quality firearms that will hold there value, preform reliably, and/or give the owner some bragging rights at the range.


Bull Nose Formula/ 461/ Q-Jet/
TH400/ 3.08 8.5 / R44TS.

Edited by - Blued and Painted on 26 Mar 2018 10:55:50 AM
Go to Top of Page

beertracker
Cochise

363 Posts

Posted - 27 Mar 2018 :  7:42:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The problem I see with waiting periods is if you are in a abusive relationship and you need a firearm to protect yourself. I don't believe restraining orders protect lives; they are too little too late. Nothing stops a bad guy with a gun better than a good guy with a gun. bt
Go to Top of Page

Bill Boyle
Horse Feathers (Charter Member)

USA
5024 Posts

Posted - 28 Mar 2018 :  06:15:06 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Boyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Isn't all of this about "law breakers?" A law abiding person has a conscience and an ethic that guides him not to do anything illegal especially when it come to assaulting another person. A person who is no longer capable of controlling their emotions that overrides the conscience and ethic not to do something illegal is bent on self destruction. "I'm going to do this because I don't care."

Mental illness, or mental health problems, use of drugs (all kinds) can very easily promote this ( "I'm going to do this because I don't care." ) kind of behavior towards others.

How many cars and trucks are on the roads in the US? There are probably more than the human population. Each one of them could be used as the instrumentality to assault another person or persons. Each vehicle is a dangerous instrumentality and while only some vehicles were designed to assault people, places and things, firearms were designed as a means to hunt as well as to defend and protect as well as assault others during time of war. By themselves, that is without human involvement, both are benign. Without human involvement neither are useful. It is all what one does with it that makes the difference.

So, to answer my own question, it sure seems that it all comes down to "law breaking." If a person wants to assault others, that person, becomes a law breaker. The cause behind that behavior may be many things. Controlling criminal conduct will always be something difficult to achieve. Instituting more stringent firearms control effecting millions of good, law abiding gun owners and users to stop a handful of law breakers (criminals, mental health "sickos") doesn't make a whole lot of sense.

So, how do we try an prevent assaults, domestic violence and mass shootings of innocent people? Instilling good, moral, core values into our children might be helpful in the long run. Detecting and doing something about those souls that are lost, mentally ill, and showing signs of angst toward others might be helpful as well. All and all, it's a tough thing to solve.

"Dedicated to keeping the classic Pontiac engine alive."

----
400 bored +.030, forged TRW pistons, ported 62 heads, Hedman headers, 2.5 SS dual exhaust X Pypes, Comp 276AH10 cam, Scorpion 1.65 RR, 850 Q-jet, stock intake & tuned HEI; original owner.
Go to Top of Page
   Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Pontiac Street Performance © 2006-2017 Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.12 seconds. This Site Sponsored By:
Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05